Lincoln Christ's Hospital School

Lincoln Christ's Hospital School
Educating in Lincoln since 1090

 

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The death of the celebrated musician Sir Neville Marriner has recently been announced.

 

Neville Marriner was a pupil at Lincoln School from 1934 to 1940, and was a contemporary of Charles Garton. He was born in Lincoln in 1924, and after leaving school he attended the Royal College of Music in London, and also studied at the Paris Conservatoire. His main instrument was the violin, and in the early stages of his career he played with the London Philharmonic Orchestra and the London Symphony Orchestra. During that period he played under such conducting legends as Toscanini, Furtwangler and Karajan. He later went on to conduct most of the world’s great orchestras, and founded the internationally renowned Academy of St Martin-in-the-Fields, the most comprehensively recorded chamber orchestra in the world.

His potential as a violinist was recognised in the July 1938 edition of The Lincolnian, the School magazine. The School Notes recorded that ‘N Marriner continues to do well as a violinist; he was second with 87 marks in the open violin class at the recent Skegness Music Festival’. The July 1941 edition celebrated his being awarded the Morley Scholarship at the Royal College of Music for the second successive year.

However, Sir Neville was not the best behaved of pupils and his name appeared in the Prefects’ Detention Book on a number of occasions for such heinous crimes as persistent cheek and fooling about in the library! His sense of mischief was also recorded in an interview in The Times. During the 1950s, when he was a young musician, Sir Neville recalled that he larked about with the best of them, and bombed the London Symphony Orchestra bus with a load of flour bags dropped from a friend’s Tiger Moth plane on the road from Brussels to Ostend!

However, it is for Sir Neville’s outstanding contribution to the world of Classical music that he will be remembered, and you may read more about Sir Neville’s distinguished career in the following link to an article in the Garton Archive at LCHS, including visits in the 1980s, when he conducted the school orchestra.

 

http://www.christs-hospital.lincs.sch.uk/index.php/our-school/lchs-history/school-archive/238-sir-neville-marriner

 

 

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